I just want some clarification whether it is correct to add a book summary to the book submission Notes.

It has always been my understanding that Notes are used for expanding on the data within the submission. The Guidelines state https://books.discogs.com/guidelines/book#notes:

"Use this free text field to add any additional details about the book that don't fit in any of the above fields. This includes distinguishing features of the book, or secondary sources consulted for the submission.

Don't use this field for data that belongs in another field.

Please do not include subjective opinions, reviews, promotional language or hype, or condition notes."

I also see a possible breach of copyright when users add text that is copied and pasted from Amazon (or other sites) into their book submission.

I just want some clarification whether it is correct to add a book summary to the book submission Notes.

I think a summary for a book can be written in the corresponding work pages. It should be kept in a brief and objective style concerning only the works content, its history and similar verifiable informations.

I also see a possible breach of copyright when users add text that is copied and pasted from Amazon (or other sites) into their book submission.

Yes. It has to be clarified, that the content provided should be written by the user himself or is, at least, free of any copyright. Linking to the source of other authors text should be mandatory.

GruenerTee wrote:

I think a summary for a book can be written in the corresponding work pages. It should be kept in a brief and objective style concerning only the works content, its history and similar verifiable informations.

the content provided should be written by the user himself or is, at least, free of any copyright

Agreed. The work page is a better place for a summary/synopsis.

As Discogs release notes guidelines do forbid any content that could be seen as a copyright violation, I assume that's the case here as well. The less you use other people's words, the less likely you (or Discogs) will get into trouble.

When I joined Discogs, copy-pasting whole blocks of text from anywhere, including the release and Wikipedia, was strictly forbidden. If you wrote more than the short, basic description, it had to be original, or at least paraphrased/summarized w/link to the source, not just directly copied.

That said, the last time I have seen someone actually enforcing the above, was a while ago. I'm not sure whether the management's view is still as strict.

In Russian books published in the 1970s—1990s there can practically always be found such brief summary that's intended to explain what the book is about in an objective manner. It's even more a descriptive information about the book than its cover/typographic art (represented here in 'Fair Use' reasoning).
It's printed on copyright page or on one of the last pages and the author of the text isn't specified in 99.9% cases, the chief editor must be the one responsible for providing that text.
Obviously, EVERY book seller will want to list that text (without altering it). I have zero doubt that it belongs somewhere in the book's entry. It's DATA. Practice to include some hype-ish quotes from branded critics came to Russian book printing much later and never replaced the objective summary writing practice, in many cases they co-exist in a book.
And such summary isn't work-related as it likely will be rewritten for any re-issue.

Analog Science Fiction & Fact magazine has an introduction to each of its stories and articles. I've been considering adding that introduction in Works. For example for 'Stardance' (March 1977):
"When humankind expands its habitat into the space environment, we will take with us us all the things that make us human -- including the need for art."
Introduction from "Analog Science Fiction & Fact" magazine.

Yes? No? Suggestions?

DarkStar1951 as soon as you start quoting someone else's work you need to be mindful of possible copyright infringement.

Also, based on the quote that you have provided, I really don't see much value in something that sounds like the opening monologue to the original Star Trek. That quote in no way helps me understand the work.

I would always err on the side of caution. If you don't know whether the text is still copyrighted, and whether it would be possible to quote it under the fair use laws, don't quote it.

IIRC, there was a discussion a long time ago about adding plot keywords to the notes. It might be an easier solution to those who want to add something about the plot, but don't feel comfortable writing their own summary.

There might be some overlap with genres and credits, but for Stardance some of the keywords could be:
science fiction, art, dance, first contact, aliens, space travel

I was hunting for something in the Guidelines today when I came across this:

"Forbidden content for an (sic) Credit profile

Copy/pasted info from the internet, or any other copyrighted or credited material"

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