Could somebody explain to me, when to use Franchise and when to use Series?

Is Series meaning, that all books form one big story? And Franchise means, that the books use the same characters and basically the same setting but tell independent stories? Or is there something related to the publishers and authors?

A book series is a sequence of books having certain characteristics in common that are formally identified together as a group. They are normally written by the same author, but occasionally the series can be written by other authors as well.

A franchise is a collection of related media in which several derivative works have been produced from an original creative work of fiction, such as a film, a work of literature, a television program or a video game.

Examples of series that are also franchises include: Star Wars, James Bond, Harry Potter, Star Trek, etc.

If a book is part of a known series then use Series. If the book is not part of a series but relates to the broader media franchise then use Franchise.

I hope that makes sense.

Thanks for the answer. This would mean, that all books under https://books.discogs.com/credit/192956-sesame-street should use Franchise in credits?

I'm not an expert on Sesame Street, but if these books don't have a known series then they would fall under the classification of franchise.

The question is, has an author (or authors) written a series of Sesame Street books?

A good example using this book here https://books.discogs.com/book/207385-the-sesame-street-library-volume-01 here, would be to use Sesame Street as the Franchise and then use ''The Sesame Street Library'' as the series.

Personally, I would use Publisher Series for The Sesame Street Library as per https://muppet.fandom.com/wiki/The_Sesame_Street_Library

When that book was submitted, Publisher Series as a Credit role might not have existed. The only option could have been Series.

That site also has a list of series/publisher series: https://muppet.fandom.com/wiki/Category:Sesame_Street_Book_Series

Supernaut1970 wrote:

A good example using this book here https://books.discogs.com/book/207385-the-sesame-street-library-volume-01 here, would be to use Sesame Street as the Franchise and then use ''The Sesame Street Library'' as the series.

Ok, so this is the way I tried to do it so far.

But still I'm unsure how to handle my case. Maybe I try to explain it:

I was working on the Pixi Books:
- There is a publisher series for all types of pixi books: https://books.discogs.com/credit/19204-pixi-series
- There is a publisher series of Pixi-Bücher which is one special type of the publisher series: https://books.discogs.com/credit/37656-pixi-bucher
- And now, some of them tell stories about one special character named Pixi: https://books.discogs.com/book/66648-pixi-geht-schwimmen, https://books.discogs.com/book/66651-pixi-und-der-zauberer, https://books.discogs.com/book/56483-pixi-und-die-kleinen-gespenster, ...

I would like to group these but even with your additional explanations I'm not sure how. I tend to use series here. What do you think?

This is what I would do:

https://books.discogs.com/credit/19204-pixi-series​ treat as a primary Publisher Series.

https://books.discogs.com/credit/37656-pixi-bucher​ treat as a secondary Publisher Series.

For the books that concern the character Pixi you could use an About/Subject Credit for Pixi, or if these books are a distinct series then treat them as a third Publisher Series.

One thought that has occurred to me is whteher Pixi-Bücher could be considered an imprint.

You might remember that we had a lengthy discussion about publisher series and imprints. Sometimes it is difficult to tell one from the other and publishing companies alternate the two terms.

I can't help you with this specific example as everything I have looked at has been translated and it is difficult to make an assessment.

One thought that has occurred to me is whether Pixi-Bücher could be considered an imprint.

You might remember that we had a lengthy discussion about publisher series and imprints. Sometimes it is difficult to tell one from the other and publishing companies alternate the two terms.

I can't help you with this specific example as everything I have looked at has been translated and it is difficult to make an assessment.

(I wish the Forum had spell check.)

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